App.Mod.E is a project conceived by a consortium of European agencies and companies. It offers support to upper secondary and higher VET students in transition from schools to employment. The overall aim of the project is to help students to acquire entrepreneurial mind-set and skills during their apprenticeship in a company.

Publiziert in Entrepreneurial skills

The Award will celebrate educational practices from all over Europe that can demonstrate the use of creative and inclusive learning methods with outstanding results and the potential to be replicated and/or of inspiring others. The Award is not limited to a particular sector; lifelong learning covers education and training across all ages and in all areas of life be it formal, non-formal or informal.

Intrapreneurship and the intrapreneur have entered the business vocabulary quite recently, but in a short time they have managed to attract interest, especially in the leading sector and industry of ICT. Competition, the need for the development of new ideas, the ever changing business and corporate environment, leave no options to simply overlook creativity wherever it comes from. Companies and businesses need all too often to rely on the innovative entrepreneurial potential of their human resources. What organisations have to do is allow intrapreneurship to flourish, stimulating and supporting potential intrapreneurs.

All too often projects fail to prove sustainable. Quite simply without external funding the products and practices developed do not survive. But sometimes they take off and resonate in new ways even without a financial stimulus. So it is with RadioActive. RadioActive was a project funded under the European Commission’s Lifelong Learning project to develop the use of internet radio with unemployed people and socially disadvantaged groups. And although the funding finished over a year ago, projects partners in three countries – Germany, Portugal and the Uk are still producing radio programmes.

On 28th Jan was London’s turn. At 1400 UK time, 1500 CET the University of East London presented a show entitled “DJ showdown: older DJs and today’s crop of Turntablists trade blows.” Is DJing an art form? With digital tech so easily available and virtually unlimited access to MP3s via a laptop, is everyone now a DJ? And if so does that mean older people who learnt their craft through hard graft have wasted their time? Don’t all the years of physically carrying lbs of vinyl to clubs and then actually mixing records live amount to something? We examine what does it mean to be a DJ in 2016 and how it has changed over the last three decades.

We compared the different styles of mixing music ranging from Geoff Humphries who DJ’d in the house music scene of Ibiza, Rhythm Vandals (mostly playing the clubs in Leeds in the 90s) right up to newest wave of teenage Turntablists where Abrakadaniel beat mixes for us. Tracks include the Sex Pistols, Madonna/Abba, the late Lemmy from Motörhead through to Soulwax. What influence have new techniques and digital accuracy that take account of key and time signatures actually had on mixing? We hear the likes of Titancube, RiFF RAFF, Skrillex, Datsik, Brillz & LAXX and more.

You can listen to the recording of this and other programmes at

Source: Pontydysgu - Bridge to Learning

Thanks to Graham Attwell for sharing with us!

 

The TIM project develops an on-line collaborative learning environment to develop creativity among workers in the metal industry so that they will be the drivers of the introduction of innovation in the metalworking companies. The steel industry is one of the key sectors at European level, not only for being one of the main generators of employment, but also for being one of the most profitable of all European manufacturing industries. This is recognized by the Directorate General for Enterprise and Industry of the European Commission in its publication “Spotlight on Europe’s invisible sector”, pointing to Germany followed by Italy, France, UK and Spain as the largest producers.

Q4I means Quality for Innovation, and is the core concept around which a number of European institutions and networks have joined forces to create an easy to use approach to quality management for innovative schools. The developed model identifies the core dependencies that schools should address before and during innovative processes.

Q4I is an easy to use approach to quality management for innovative schools. The developed model identifies the core dependencies that school should address before and during innovative processes. The Q4I model is based on seven Areas of change and four Engines of Change. The Q4I Focus Areas are: